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Habitat & Enclosure

The size snake terrarium you will need depends on the type of snake you have.

Substrate/Bedding : Layer the bottom of the habitat with bedding (also called substrate) that your new pet can burrow into. Aspen & cypress shavings are a natural, odorless reptile substrate that snakes can tunnel through it as they’d do in the wild. Spot clean the bedding often to remove droppings. Stir the substrate at least once a week and change the bedding entirely at least once a month. 

Lighting/Heating : Climate control is crucial to the health of your snake, who may suffer digestion problems if the temperature isn’t suitable. Snakes, like all reptiles, are cold-blooded and need a heating source to regulate their body temperature. Under-tank heating pads are the preferred method of delivering the heat as opposed to overhead habitat bulbs, which can stress the snake. Be sure to warm only one side of the tank to give your snake a choice of microclimates, and keep a thermometer on each side of the habitat to monitor the warm and cool temperature.

Humidity: Maintaining the right moisture level helps keep your snake healthy, so a hygrometer, which measures moisture in the air, is a must for your pet’s habitat. Low humidity can make it hard for snakes to slither smoothly out of their skin during shedding time. When necessary, spray your snake’s space with a mister, put in more water dishes, or add moistened moss.

Diet

Snakes are carnivorous, meaning they only eat meat. If you have a squeamish stomach, then they might not necessarily be the right pet for your home. In the wild, snakes love pray that they can hunt and eat whole. Feed your pet snake frozen (then thawed) rodents one night a week. Snakes don’t need to eat very much. Some adults might not feed for several weeks at a time. Learning how to take care of a snake might take some trial and error with their feeding times. 

 

Veterinarian Health Checks

Before you even bring your pet snake home, you should find a veterinarian in your area who is familiar with snakes. Your snake should always have regularly scheduled appointments with their vet to make sure they're in their best health. Your vet will always be a great resource when learning how to take care of a snake. Aside from those visits, call your vet if you notice any of the following signs in your pet: 

Excess hiding 

Eating/drinking less

Weight loss

Shedding problems

Discolored skin

Discharge from the eyes, nose or mouth

Labored breathing

Runny droppings for more than two days

Decreased frequency of droppings